When False Flags Go Virtual – James Corbett

Imagine this: you wake up to the blaring of your alarm clock and immediately reach for your smartphone to scroll your Insta feed before getting out of bed. But instead of the usual delightful and informative Instagram posts, today you’re greeted by a “server not found” error.

Deciding that it’s too early in the morning to deal with this, you hop in the shower . . . but for some reason Alexa won’t play your Spotify playlist through your bathroom smart speakers. You have to shower in silence like a luddite.

Getting frustrated, you head downstairs for breakfast. You prop your iPad up next to you and go to check your email while stuffing your face with your morning bowl of Cheeri-GMOs (now with extra HFCS!) but you’re not getting any new messages. You turn on your smart TV and navigate to YouTube so you can catch up on all the latest news from MSNBC, but all you get is the never ending spiral of the spinning “loading” wheel.

Twitter? Down.

Facebook? No luck.

Reddit? Forget it!

Increasingly desperate, you try in vain to remember how to turn on your regular terrestrial TV. Then you recall you have something collecting dust in a closet somewhere: a radio. You turn it on, fumble with the dial, and find a station just in time to hear the announcement:

“. . . is claiming responsibility for the outage. Once again, widespread outages across a range of internet services is sweeping the globe this morning, as a shadowy new terror group emerges to take responsibility . . .”

Suddenly, your phone starts making a strange sound. You don’t know what it’s doing at first, until you realize it’s ringing. One of your friends is calling you. On the phone. Not texting, tweeting, messaging or snapchatting. Actually calling you.

“Hello?”

“Hey Norm! You hear about the big news? Internet’s down!”

“Yeah.”

“They say it’s some kind of new terror group. Cybeterrorists In Action. C.I.A. for short. Sounds pretty scary.”

. . . Oh, OK, I’ll stop teasing. Of course this doesn’t describe you or your daily routines, dear reader. I know you’re the clued-in, switched-on sort who peruses The Corbett Report and avoids normie internet sites like the plague (the real plague, not this ginned-up COVID cold).

But don’t scoff at the scenario. A scene like this one could play out one day for billions of Normie McNormesons around the world. And when it does, there will already be a plan in place for changing the internet as we know it.

As I know you know, the transition from the homeland security state to the biosecurity state that I documented in COVID-911 raises the specter of false flag bioterrorism. But there are other vectors for false flag attacks that could cause massive disruption to our lives, and, like every spectacular false flag event, increase the power and control of the deep state. In this case, I’m thinking of false flag cyberterrorism.

The idea of a “cyber 9/11” coming along to disrupt the internet has been around since the actual 9/11 occurred. Back in 2003, even as the Pentagon was feverishly drafting its plans to “fight the net” as if it were “an enemy weapons system,” Mike McConnell, the ex-director of the National Security Agency (NSA), was fearmongering over the possibility of a cyber attack “equivalent to the attack on the World Trade Center” if a new institution were not created to oversee cybersecurity. In the following years, report after report continued to use the horror of 9/11 as a way of fueling public hysteria over cyberterrorism until just such a US Cyber Command was created.

But the creation of CYBERCOM did not end the cyber threat anymore than the creation of the Department of Homeland Security ended the terror threat, and for precisely the same reason: the real terror threat doesn’t come from the cave-dwelling terrorists that the politicians tell us to be afraid of. No, the real terror threat comes from the very agencies that have been tasked with “saving” the public from the terrorist bogeymen.

When False Flags Go Virtual

Published by TCTTNews

Sharing real news, information & analysis.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: